2013-02-28 / Ag News

The Record’s Ag Report

By Terri Lang

February 25, 2013

Nearly 1,000 head of cattle ran through the Linton Livestock Market on Mon., Feb. 18.

Although the market has been down some in the past two weeks, cattle buyers believe it will rebound.

“The drop in fat cattle market prices was not expected,” cattle buyer Brian Gader of Napoleon said. “Producers are selling their finished fat cattle for less than planned.”

Brian and his son, Paul, purchase approximately 65,000 cattle per year for several feedlots. Brian attends livestock sales nearly every day of the week. Gaders purchase for feedlots mostly in North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado.

“Those buyers in the south like the cattle we purchase here in North Dakota as they know they are well fed, well cared for and of good quality,” Gaders said.

Even though the prices have been down a bit, Gaders say producers are still getting pretty good money for their livestock. Weigh-up or harvest cows weighing 1,280 pounds sold Feb. 18 for about $780 per head.


Auctioneer Herman Schumacher asks for buyers to bid up and points out the good quality, well fed, clean and well-cared for cattle at the Linton Livestock Market. On Schumacher’s left is Linton Livestock Market Co-Manager Doug Kilen and on the right is Denise Morman on computer entry. Auctioneer Herman Schumacher asks for buyers to bid up and points out the good quality, well fed, clean and well-cared for cattle at the Linton Livestock Market. On Schumacher’s left is Linton Livestock Market Co-Manager Doug Kilen and on the right is Denise Morman on computer entry. “That’s a pretty good price for older cows,” Gader said. “It’s a good salvage value for your cows.”

Feeder cattle prices have been down more so than cow prices.

“Fat cattle are losing some money right now,” buyer and Co-Manager of Herreid Livestock J.R. Scott said. “That is partly due to the high price of corn.”

Scott believes cattle should be higher though as the demand is there.


Nearly 1,000 head of cattle sold at the Linton Livestock Market on Mon., Feb. 18. Nearly 1,000 head of cattle sold at the Linton Livestock Market on Mon., Feb. 18. The first week in January of 2013, the feeder contract market for fall 2013 was at $163 to $165 and now is around $157. The live cattle contract for April 2013 was at $137 to $138, and that has dropped to about $125.

Auctioneer and cattle buyer Herman Schumacher of Herreid agrees that prices should be higher and that there is not a demand problem.

“We do have a limited supply of cattle in the U.S., and, fundamentally, the market should be better,” Schumacher said.

Schumacher attributes the packers’ alignment with the retail industry for the market prices.

“It is packer controlled, and the packers control the feedlots,” he said.

Linton Livestock Co- Manager Clyde Bosch said in the past couple weeks heavier cattle have dropped $7 to $10 per hundredweight and lighter cattle $5 to $8.


Feeder cattle prices are down from Jan. 2013. Feeders weighing about 560 pounds sold at the Mon., Feb. 18, Linton Livestock Market for $170 cwt. or about $950 per head. Feeder cattle prices are down from Jan. 2013. Feeders weighing about 560 pounds sold at the Mon., Feb. 18, Linton Livestock Market for $170 cwt. or about $950 per head. Bosch realizes that farmers would like to see those prices back up as it takes lots of dollars to raise those animals.

“Feed costs are very high,” Bosch said. “In addition to that, everyone is concerned about their feed supply for this coming season with the moisture situation we are in.”

Bosch has a positive outlook for the livestock industry.

“I think in the near future, we will see the market prices improving again,” Bosch said.



Linton Livestock Market Co-Manager Clyde Bosch looks forward to stronger market prices soon. Linton Livestock Market Co-Manager Clyde Bosch looks forward to stronger market prices soon.

Cattle buyers Brian Gader and son, Paul, right, purchase nearly 65,000 cattle per year and said buyers in the south like the high quality cattle from North Dakota. Cattle buyers Brian Gader and son, Paul, right, purchase nearly 65,000 cattle per year and said buyers in the south like the high quality cattle from North Dakota.

Herreid Livestock Co-Manager and cattle buyer J.R. Scott believes feeder cattle prices should be higher right now as the demand is there. Herreid Livestock Co-Manager and cattle buyer J.R. Scott believes feeder cattle prices should be higher right now as the demand is there.

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