2013-03-28 / Ag News

Symbols of Easter are appearing

By Terri Lang


Lambs, a symbol as people thought of Jesus as the Good Shepherd who would watch over them as they were lambs, are present on the Derry and Melanie Pool farm near Westfield. Mama ewe is watching over her baby lamb. Lambs, a symbol as people thought of Jesus as the Good Shepherd who would watch over them as they were lambs, are present on the Derry and Melanie Pool farm near Westfield. Mama ewe is watching over her baby lamb. The signs of Easter are appearing in our homes and our churches, our schools and our businesses and on our farms. Those traditional symbols—eggs, bunnies, chicks, lamb—why do we associate them with Easter?

It is common knowledge that Easter is a Christian celebration of Christ’s rising, but this holiday also has pagan origins. Easter falls in the spring, the yearly time of renewal, when the earth renews itself after a long, cold winter.

Easter eggs are special eggs that are often given to celebrate Easter and are common during the season of Eastertide. Most cultures around the world use the egg as a symbol of new life and rebirth. In Christianity, they symbolize the empty tomb of Jesus. Though an egg appears to be like the stone of a tomb, a bird hatches from it with life. Similarly, the Easter egg, for Christians, is a reminder that Jesus rose from the grave, and that those who believe will also experience eternal life.


Children on the Derry and Melanie Pool farm near Westfield, seven-year-old Rebekah and four-year-old Brady, love to cuddle the baby lambs that are less than a week old. Their seven-month-old brother, Corey, is too little to hold the lambs. Children on the Derry and Melanie Pool farm near Westfield, seven-year-old Rebekah and four-year-old Brady, love to cuddle the baby lambs that are less than a week old. Their seven-month-old brother, Corey, is too little to hold the lambs. The Easter Bunny arose originally as a symbol of fertility, due to the rapid reproduction habits of the hare and rabbit. The Bible makes no mention of a longeared, short-tailed creature who delivers decorated eggs to well-behaved children on Easter Sunday; nevertheless, the Easter bunny has become a prominent symbol of Christianity’s most important holiday. The exact origins of the bunny are unclear, but rabbits are an ancient symbol of fertility and new life.


Derry Pool said they have six baby lambs as of last week. They run about 60 Rambouillet ewes and sell their sheep in the fall at a weight of 90 to 100 pounds. In November of 2012, they sold them for $.90 to $1.00 per pound compared to $2.20 two years ago. Pool said they are very labor intensive, and his father, Jerome Pool, agreed, and believes that there have been lambs on the Pool family farm for nearly 95 years. Derry Pool said they have six baby lambs as of last week. They run about 60 Rambouillet ewes and sell their sheep in the fall at a weight of 90 to 100 pounds. In November of 2012, they sold them for $.90 to $1.00 per pound compared to $2.20 two years ago. Pool said they are very labor intensive, and his father, Jerome Pool, agreed, and believes that there have been lambs on the Pool family farm for nearly 95 years. Apart from being a traditional delicacy in the Easter dinner, Easter lamb is also a part of religious symbolism. It is a symbol as people thought of Jesus as the Good Shepherd who would watch over them as they were lambs. Easter lamb also represents Jesus and relates his death to that of the lamb, sacrificed on the first Passover. Christians traditionally refer to Jesus as “the Lamb of God.”



Kimberly Droog uses an incubator she received from her grandmother, and watches the eggs for about three weeks until they hatch, then leaves them in the house for a day or two, and next to the barn for three weeks. They go out to the chicken coop for the summer where they begin to lay eggs. Droog still has the original Sears box that the incubator was initially shipped in the early 1950s. The postage price on the box (10"x24"x24") was $1.26. Kimberly Droog uses an incubator she received from her grandmother, and watches the eggs for about three weeks until they hatch, then leaves them in the house for a day or two, and next to the barn for three weeks. They go out to the chicken coop for the summer where they begin to lay eggs. Droog still has the original Sears box that the incubator was initially shipped in the early 1950s. The postage price on the box (10"x24"x24") was $1.26.

Eggs, a symbol of spring as well as Easter, are a sign of new life. At the Droog farm near Hull, Kimberly Droog collected several colored eggs from their chicken coop. Eggs, a symbol of spring as well as Easter, are a sign of new life. At the Droog farm near Hull, Kimberly Droog collected several colored eggs from their chicken coop.

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